Monthly Archives: June 2005

content creators/education > physical documents

adding Creative Commons licences to your physical documents
===========
When you are marking a physical document such as printed page from a text document, or hand written material, you need to physically write a notice of the licence.

 

choose a licence step 2: choose a licence
————–

Before you can add the source code to your website you first need to choose a licence. The licence chooser provides an easy to use interface for choosing a licence. Fill in the questions and the appropriate licence is automatically generated.

launch launch licence chooser

 

step 3: mark the work
————–
Give notice of the licence, along with your copyright notice, on each item you wish the licence to apply to. For example:
>© John Citizen 2005
>this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence
>full terms at [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

 

The URL listed points potential users of your work to the Commons Deed applicable to your licence.
 

 

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content creators/education > electronic file formats

embedding Creative Commons licences to electronic file formats other than HTML
=============
This section refers to the process of embedding files other than HTML with Creative Commons metadata. There are many file types that creators who use images would want to use other than HTML.

Many Adobe applications support embedding XMP metadata in files. The Creative Commons licensing process offers an XMP template which may be used to mark documents with Creative Commons license information.

 

choose a licence step 2: choose a licence
————-

Before you can add the source code to your website you first need to choose a licence. The licence chooser provides an easy to use interface for choosing a licence. Fill in the questions and the appropriate licence is automatically generated.

launch launch licence chooser

 

step 3: save the XMP template
————-

In the second step of the licensing process, see “To mark a PDF or other XMP-supported file, save this template following these instructions.” Click on “save this template”. You will be prompted to
save a file.

 

Under Windows save it to:

 
 

C:\Documents and Settings\{user}\Application Data\Adobe\XMP\Metadata Templates

note: where {user} is replaced with your Windows username.

 
 
 

Under OS X save the file to:

 
 

/Users/{user}/Library/Application Support/Adobe/XMP/Metadata Templates
note: where {user} is replaced with your OS X short username. You will likely have to manually create the “Metadata Templates” directory before saving.

 

step 4: mark the document
———–

Within your Adobe application (for example Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator) open the metadata panel while editing a file you want to mark (File> File Info in Photoshop). Using the fly-out menu in the upper right corner of the panel, choose the template you saved.

figure1

 
 

In Acrobat 6, go to Advanced> Document Metadata, select the Advanced panel on the left, then click on replace and select the XMP text file that you downloaded.

Creative Commons license information will appear in the Description panel.

 

 

In the second step of the licensing process, see “To mark a PDF or other XMP-supported file, save this template following these instructions.” Click on “save this template”. You will be prompted to
save a file. Under Windows save it to

 
 

note: a licensed image file should include a written copyright notice as well as embedded metadata.

 
 

step 5: save and publish
—————

Save your file. If publishing on the web the page that links to your XMP-marked document should contain a license notice and metadata, which can be copied from the same licensing process.

 

step 6: thinking of hosting your files on a website?
————–

If you going to host your newly licenced electronic files on your own website, you should think about embedding your website with licence information too.

If you don’t have your own site, don’t panic! Other organisations have free hosting that already integrate Creative Commons licences.

You can get specific information on publishing to Flickr or to Buzznet

 

step 7: add your content to the search engine
—————-

Now your electronic files are licenced, you should add them to the international Creative Commons search engine.

 

more infoStill unsure how to embed licence information into an electronic file format? The Creative Commons site has information on using metadata

Still unsure how to embed metadata into a PDF? The Creative Commons site has information on using metadata in PDFs

 

 

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content creators/education > for websites

adding Creative Commons licences to your website hosting your academic writing
===========
choose a licence step 2: choose a licence
————–

Before you can add the source code to your website you first need to choose a licence. The licence chooser provides an easy to use interface for choosing a licence. Fill in the questions and the appropriate licence is automatically generated.

launch launch licence chooser

 

copy the code step 3: copy the code
—————-

On the “Mark your content” page of the license process, copy the code provided. First highlight all the code and then use the Copy function in Edit menu, or right click and use the Copy function (PC only) or press Ctrl + c (Command + c on a Mac).

 

paste the code step 4: paste the code to your site
————–

The specifics of the last step will depend on how you edit your website. Most desktop website tools like Dreamweaver, Frontpage, or GoLive offer a “code view” that lets you see the code that makes up your page. Near the end of the page you are hosting text, before you see , paste in the code copied in the step 3. You can do this by using the Paste function in Edit menu, or right click and use the Paste function (PC only) or press Ctrl + v (Command + v on a Mac).

 

step 5: points on marking your content
—————

  • specifically define what you’re licensing: websites are often made up of several components. You should note whether you’re licensing the entire site, or just certain text, pages, graphics, or files.
  • put the reference in a prominent, visible place: You should place the reference right next to the work you intend to license. If you cannot easily place it next to each work or if you are licensing a
    large group of works, place the reference somewhere near the top of the page or along a sidebar, rather than hidden at the footer of the page. In addition, make sure that the link appears wherever the licensed works appear on your site, rather than just on the front page
  • use the CC button to mark your content (if possible): this symbol will help people easily recognise that your content is licensed. You can add this button to your site by using the full HTML/RDF supplied during your license selection process. Otherwise, use an ostensible, plain text link.

for example:

 

example1example2example3

* Scott Andrew lets visitors know each song is licensed with a prominent button and message
* Stickbugblog places its button visibly on its sidebar, asserting specifically that all content is licensed
* Bag and Baggage explains that all pages within the site are licensed

 

more info Still unsure how to embed licence information into a webstie? The Creative Commons site has information on marking HTML

 

 

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content creators/education

lesson plans, course packets + textbooks
=============

So you want your academic writing to be licensed? Creative Commons licences can help you expand the exposure of your writing. Just follow the step-by-step guide below.

 

step 1: determine the nature of the text

Depending on the nature of the work you want to cover, will define how you can licence the work. Your work could be:

 

 

more info If you have a blog it’s even easier, because Creative Commons has a guide to publishing your blog under a licence.

 

 

don’t have your own site?
————-

If you don’t have your own site, don’t panic! Other organisations have free hosting that already integrate Creative Commons licences

 

 

 

more info Looking for more information on using Creative Commons licences as an academic writer? See the education section of the Creative Commons website

 

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content creators/text > physical documents

adding Creative Commons licences to your physical documents
===========
When you are marking a physical document such as printed page from a text document, or hand written material, you need to physically write a notice of the licence.

 

choose a licence step 2: choose a licence
————–

Before you can add the source code to your website you first need to choose a licence. The licence chooser provides an easy to use interface for choosing a licence. Fill in the questions and the appropriate licence is automatically generated.

launch launch licence chooser

 

step 3: mark the work
————–
Give notice of the licence, along with your copyright notice, on each item you wish the licence to apply to. For example:
>© John Citizen 2005
>this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence
>full terms at [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

 

The URL listed points potential users of your work to the Commons Deed applicable to your licence.
 

 

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