Date claimer: Creative Commons for You, and for Government

Can’t get enough of CC? We will be making our way down to Canberra in about a month, so make sure you mark it in your diaries!

A free public seminar on the topic CC for You, and for Government, will be presented by Professor Anne Fitzgerald, Neale Hooper and Cheryl Foong on Friday, 4 November 2011, 9.00am – 3.30pm at National Library of Australia (Theatre at Lower ground floor), Parkes Place, ACT.

We want to make this event meaningful for you. If you have encountered any practical or operational issues in your personal or working environments, please contact Cheryl Foong at We will do our best to accomodate your interests.

For more details, updates and to RSVP, please visit the event page.

“Yes, We’re Open!”: Platform Journal Special Issue Launched!

Photo: Untitled by pheezyThe team at ccAustralia and the Editorial Board and team at PLATFORM: Journal of Media and Communication are very pleased to announce the publication of the “Yes, we are open!” special edition issue. Guest edited by ccAustralia staffer Elliott Bledsoe, and former staffer Jessica Coates,  this issue presents submissions by postgraduate students around the world working in media studies or related fields which critically examine the legal, social and technical parameters of open source, open content and open access.

Jess and I received a number of really interesting submission exploring the question we posed in the abstract: why open? We open the issue with an interview with Esther Wojcicki, Vice-Chair of Creative Commons,  to discuss the importance of teaching ‘open’ in schools. Rachel Cobcroft follows with an reflection on the development of the international Creative Commons Case Studies initiative. Cobcroft’s piece examines the progress of open content licensing; identifies models of implementation and licensing trends across industry sectors as diverse as music, government, wikis and fashion; and, perhaps most importantly, explores individual motivations for the adoption of open philosophies.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Untitled‘ by pheezy, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

New biodiversity atlas encourages sharing of knowledge

Photo: Superb Lyre Bird 1 by Ian Sanderson
The Atlas of Living Australia is a new Australian Government collaborative initiative led by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Acting as a portal, the Atlas facilitates users to explore, combine and analyse information and data on Australian plants and animals. It includes authoritative species lists and classifications, mapping and identification tools, images, literature and occurrence records contributed by a number of data providers.

To help support that aim, the Atlas encourages contributing data providers to license their contributions under a Creative Commons licence. Specifically, because the Atlas wants to ensure content is open for downstream use, the Atlas does not support licensing under either of the two No Derivative Works licences.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Superb Lyre Bird 1‘ by Ian Sanderson, CC BY-NC 2.0 Generic.