Date claimer: Creative Commons for You, and for Government

Can’t get enough of CC? We will be making our way down to Canberra in about a month, so make sure you mark it in your diaries!

A free public seminar on the topic CC for You, and for Government, will be presented by Professor Anne Fitzgerald, Neale Hooper and Cheryl Foong on Friday, 4 November 2011, 9.00am – 3.30pm at National Library of Australia (Theatre at Lower ground floor), Parkes Place, ACT.

We want to make this event meaningful for you. If you have encountered any practical or operational issues in your personal or working environments, please contact Cheryl Foong at We will do our best to accomodate your interests.

For more details, updates and to RSVP, please visit the event page.

Australian Dress Register an open closet to our history

Once again, our Australian cultural institutions are showing their resourcefulness in making the most of web 2.0 technology to share historical information with the public.

The Australian Design Register, an initiative of the Powerhouse Museum and several other historical and cultural institutions,

Credits—Photo: Australian Dress Register – 19th century convict jacket by Powerhouse Museum, CC BY NC 3.0 Au

ACMI generates rights literacy by releasing quality media products

Photo: Chunky by Yun Huang Yong
The Australian Centre for the Moving Image joins a growing list of Australian and international arts institutions making resources available for reuse and remixing under Creative Commons. In September last year ACMI launched Generator, an online creative studio space for students and teachers to access and engage with screen content. This week ACMI expanded on its commitment to teaching screen literacy through dynamic programs by relicensing the downloadable media resources on Generator under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommerical 3.0 Australia licence. The 1000+ media products available in the Free Media Library go beyond being passive teaching aids – they are now part of the wider commons of legally reuseable content.

The ACMI has spent over 20 years delivering dynamic screen literacy programs that create deep and engaging learning spaces for young people to be active producers of screen content. ACMI’s Generator project was initiated as a concerted effort by the Centre to address changes in teaching screen media. It is the outcome of funding from the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to develop premium content for the FUSE Portal, a State-funded repository of content and resources to help teachers Find, Use and Share quality Education resources. To further that aim, ACMI looked to CC.

Credits—Photo: ‘Chunky‘ by Yun Huang Yong, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Get your floaties on, the (ABC) Pool has reopened

The roller door has been raised, the turnstiles unlocked, and everyone is invited to take a dip in the all new ABC Pool website. The new site boasts all kinds of new functionality and usability. Bomb dive your way into the site’s 11,000+ contributions with the site’s new structure, making it much easier to see uploaded content, pool contributorscollaborative projects and opportunities to get your content onto ABC websites, radio and even television. And now you can easily follow people and projects to help you keep up with your favorite pool-side punters and comment on pretty much everything on the site.

While we love the new 2.0 functionality, probably the most exciting addition (as far as ccAustralia is concerned anyway :p) is the ability to search for Pool content published under a Creative Commons licence. A much-awaited addition, users can now use the advanced search to find CC-licensed content by keyword using a drop-down menu that will return results under a specific type of CC licence. Better still is the ability to limit your results further by designating the type of media you’re looking for too!

Credits—Photo: Screenshot of ABC Pool website. Incorporates ‘Kiss me where?‘ by Kate Gauld, CC BY-NC 3.0 Unported.

New Open Access Principles for Australian’s Collecting Institutions

Photo: Escher's Cabinet of Curiosities by fdecomite
Those who have been following open access activities for a while know that some of the most interesting and innovative work in the field, both in Australia and internationally, is being done by galleries, libraries, archives and museums. Collecting institutions are a natural home for open access activities – after all, the whole point of most of them is to provide material, information and resources to the public.

It is hardly surprising, then, that as digital technologies have developed collecting institutions have generally been in the forefront, delivering their material to users and connecting with the general public in new, creative and fun ways. And as the public seeks more and more to use and interact with these materials, collecting institutions are exploring how open access policies can increase their utility for the public.

Seeing this potential, in 2009 Creative Commons Australia’s sister research centre, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation, established a research project aimed specifically at exploring and encouraging open access strategies within Australia’s collecting institutions.

After spending most of 2009 and 2010 consulting with representatives of the collecting sector in Australia, the Opening Australia’s Archives has now released its first output – the Open Access Principles for Australian Collecting Institutions.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Escher’s Cabinet of Curiosities‘ by fdecomite, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

New biodiversity atlas encourages sharing of knowledge

Photo: Superb Lyre Bird 1 by Ian Sanderson
The Atlas of Living Australia is a new Australian Government collaborative initiative led by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Acting as a portal, the Atlas facilitates users to explore, combine and analyse information and data on Australian plants and animals. It includes authoritative species lists and classifications, mapping and identification tools, images, literature and occurrence records contributed by a number of data providers.

To help support that aim, the Atlas encourages contributing data providers to license their contributions under a Creative Commons licence. Specifically, because the Atlas wants to ensure content is open for downstream use, the Atlas does not support licensing under either of the two No Derivative Works licences.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Superb Lyre Bird 1‘ by Ian Sanderson, CC BY-NC 2.0 Generic.