Peer-university course offerings open

Photo: ‘create environments for learning doodle‘ by Inha Leex HalePeer 2 Peer University (P2PU) is a collaborative, open education program that provides individuals with informal learning opportunities outside the classroom. Their main goal is to offer you the highest quality learning material and guides to help fulfil your educational requirements. They deliver on this mission through the the use of the internet and open content licences on educational packages. Running over six weeks, all of P2PU’s courses are licenced by a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licence. The free courses utilise university-grade teaching materials taught in small groups (around eight to fourteen students).

Although currently accredited is not available across the full suite of courses, P2PU is working on gaining full accreditation for all its courseware. P2PU offers fantastic programs which are run by passionate and dedicated volunteers who just want to ensure that you are receiving top quality educational service. One such course that is currently being offered is Copyright 4 Educators which is being faciliated by Delia Browne, friend of ccAustralia and well-known Australian CC and open eduation advocate. Sign up for courses has already opened. Register before 8 September 2010.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘create environments for learning doodle‘ by Inha Leex Hale, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

“Yes, We’re Open!”: A Special Issue of Platform Journal – Call for Papers Reminder

Photo: Untitled by pheezyA quick reminder for all the commons-based postgraduate researchers out there – abstracts are due this Monday for the special “Yes, We’re Open!” issue of Platform.

The issue, guest edited by the ccAustralia and ccClinic teams, will focus on the mainstreaming of “open”. With Mozilla Firefox pushing towards a 25% share of the web browser market and the number of Creative Commons licensed works reaching more than 250 million in 2009, perhaps it is time to ask, ‘Is “open” the new black?’

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Untitled‘ by pheezy, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Platform Special Issue Call for Papers Extended

Photo: Untitled by pheezyThe deadlines for the “Yes, We’re Open!” Special Issue of PLATFORM: Journal of Media and Communication have been extended. The new dates are:

17 May 2010: Abstracts/Proposals (500-800 words)
5 July 2010: Full Papers (6,000-8,000 words, including 200 word abstracts and six keywords)

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Untitled‘ by pheezy, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

“Yes, We’re Open!”: A Special Issue of Platform Journal

Photo: Untitled by pheezyJessica Coates and Elliott Bledsoe from the Creative Commons Clinic at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation are guest editing a special issue of PLATFORM: Journal of Media and Communication, a biannual open-access online graduate journal published by the Media and Communications Program at the School of Culture and Communication, University of Melbourne.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Untitled‘ by pheezy, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Queensland Museum – adding to the free photo movement


Three women going to the opera, Bert Roberts early 1900, Queensland Museum, Creative Commons License

We’ve posted before about the growing movement for cultural institutions across the globe to provide open online access to public domain images in their collections. And Australian institutions have been up there in the thick of the charge – the Powerhouse Museum, for example, was the second institution worldwide to join the Flickr Commons initiative, and has now been joined by four other Australian institutions. As a result the public can access archives they may otherwise never have seen by using only the click of a mouse.

Now the Queensland Museum has joined the party, uploading a test batch of 20 high resolution images from their collection for free online access. But what makes this initiative particularly interesting that it’s being conducted in collaboration with Wikimedia Australia and they’ve chosen to upload the photos to Wiki Commons, rather than Flickr Commons.