YouTube introduces CC Attribution option for videos

Photo: Play by Annie Roi

Google have expanded their utilisation of Creative Commons when it officially announced the introduction of Creative Commons licensing as a rights management option on YouTube (although you may have already read about it!). Now video publishers can now release their videos under a CC Attribution 3.0 Unported licence or utilise the “Standard YouTube License.”

Credits—Heading photo: ‘Play‘ by Annie Roi, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

CC-licensing now possible on Pozible

Photo: 'Money' by Maestro_AU. CC BY 2.0 Generic.
Australia’s first crowd funding platform, Pozible (nee Fundbreak), are always looking for ways to make their platform more useful for project creators. That’s why they rolled out a series of new rights management options for projects starting yesterday. Now Pozible project creators can make content related to their crowd funding proposals on the site available under Creative Commons licences.

Project creators on Pozible now have a ‘License Option’ as part of their project creation process. They can elect ‘all rights reserved’ or they can apply a CC licence using Pozible’s very stylish (yet functional) licence chooser.

Credits—Photo: Money‘ by Maestro_AU, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

ACMI generates rights literacy by releasing quality media products

Photo: Chunky by Yun Huang Yong
The Australian Centre for the Moving Image joins a growing list of Australian and international arts institutions making resources available for reuse and remixing under Creative Commons. In September last year ACMI launched Generator, an online creative studio space for students and teachers to access and engage with screen content. This week ACMI expanded on its commitment to teaching screen literacy through dynamic programs by relicensing the downloadable media resources on Generator under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommerical 3.0 Australia licence. The 1000+ media products available in the Free Media Library go beyond being passive teaching aids – they are now part of the wider commons of legally reuseable content.

The ACMI has spent over 20 years delivering dynamic screen literacy programs that create deep and engaging learning spaces for young people to be active producers of screen content. ACMI’s Generator project was initiated as a concerted effort by the Centre to address changes in teaching screen media. It is the outcome of funding from the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to develop premium content for the FUSE Portal, a State-funded repository of content and resources to help teachers Find, Use and Share quality Education resources. To further that aim, ACMI looked to CC.

Credits—Photo: ‘Chunky‘ by Yun Huang Yong, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Get your floaties on, the (ABC) Pool has reopened

The roller door has been raised, the turnstiles unlocked, and everyone is invited to take a dip in the all new ABC Pool website. The new site boasts all kinds of new functionality and usability. Bomb dive your way into the site’s 11,000+ contributions with the site’s new structure, making it much easier to see uploaded content, pool contributorscollaborative projects and opportunities to get your content onto ABC websites, radio and even television. And now you can easily follow people and projects to help you keep up with your favorite pool-side punters and comment on pretty much everything on the site.

While we love the new 2.0 functionality, probably the most exciting addition (as far as ccAustralia is concerned anyway :p) is the ability to search for Pool content published under a Creative Commons licence. A much-awaited addition, users can now use the advanced search to find CC-licensed content by keyword using a drop-down menu that will return results under a specific type of CC licence. Better still is the ability to limit your results further by designating the type of media you’re looking for too!

Credits—Photo: Screenshot of ABC Pool website. Incorporates ‘Kiss me where?‘ by Kate Gauld, CC BY-NC 3.0 Unported.

News you can use

Photo: Stack of News Papers by ♥ Cishore™ - busy
YouCommNews, Australia’s first croudsourced/funded news site, has published its first people-powered story today. “In search of non-toxic housing for health’s sake“, (pitched and) written by Toula Mantis, chronicles Katherine McIntosh’s extreme case of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. With funding received from 17 people (totaling $878), Mantis was able to research and write an article about McIntosh’s chemical sensitivities. It also made possible the production of a complimentary video that accompanies the story.

Running on platform developed by US crowd news service, YouCommNews aims to introduce the concept to Australia. The project hopes to engage members of the public in a more active role in the reporting process. This investment is multifaceted; including an investment in the content, by aligning with and financially supporting a pitch and by suggesting story ideas they would like to see reported on.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Stack of News Papers‘ by ♥ Cishore™ – busy, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

“For free and not illegally!”—A great big happy birthday to Mayer and Bettle

Still: From Mayer and BettleThis week marks the fifth birthday of ccAustralia’s fabulous animated mascots, Mayer and Bettle. So we thought it was a good time to give them a bit of love.

I’m sure you’re all fans, but for those new to CC, Mayer and Bettle are the stars of a 5 minute animation, first commissioned for the QUT Smart Train back in 2005 to provide a simple and friendly introduction to CC. Created jointly by local animation team Blackbrow (aka Pete Foley and Chris Perren) and our own Elliott Bledsoe, the film has the little blue guys travel through land, sea and space while discussing what Creative Commons is and how it works. In 2008 Mayer and Bettle returned in glorious 3D in a sequel, joining Bettle’s biggest fan, Flik, in a through the looking glass CC world to talk about how to apply the CC licences to your material.

Credits—Still: From ‘Mayer and Bettle‘ by Creative Commons Australia and Blackbrow, CC BY-SA 2.0 Australia.