Australian Dress Register an open closet to our history

Once again, our Australian cultural institutions are showing their resourcefulness in making the most of web 2.0 technology to share historical information with the public.

The Australian Design Register, an initiative of the Powerhouse Museum and several other historical and cultural institutions,

Credits—Photo: Australian Dress Register – 19th century convict jacket by Powerhouse Museum, CC BY NC 3.0 Au

CC-licensing now possible on Pozible

Photo: 'Money' by Maestro_AU. CC BY 2.0 Generic.
Australia’s first crowd funding platform, Pozible (nee Fundbreak), are always looking for ways to make their platform more useful for project creators. That’s why they rolled out a series of new rights management options for projects starting yesterday. Now Pozible project creators can make content related to their crowd funding proposals on the site available under Creative Commons licences.

Project creators on Pozible now have a ‘License Option’ as part of their project creation process. They can elect ‘all rights reserved’ or they can apply a CC licence using Pozible’s very stylish (yet functional) licence chooser.

Credits—Photo: Money‘ by Maestro_AU, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

ACMI generates rights literacy by releasing quality media products

Photo: Chunky by Yun Huang Yong
The Australian Centre for the Moving Image joins a growing list of Australian and international arts institutions making resources available for reuse and remixing under Creative Commons. In September last year ACMI launched Generator, an online creative studio space for students and teachers to access and engage with screen content. This week ACMI expanded on its commitment to teaching screen literacy through dynamic programs by relicensing the downloadable media resources on Generator under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommerical 3.0 Australia licence. The 1000+ media products available in the Free Media Library go beyond being passive teaching aids – they are now part of the wider commons of legally reuseable content.

The ACMI has spent over 20 years delivering dynamic screen literacy programs that create deep and engaging learning spaces for young people to be active producers of screen content. ACMI’s Generator project was initiated as a concerted effort by the Centre to address changes in teaching screen media. It is the outcome of funding from the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to develop premium content for the FUSE Portal, a State-funded repository of content and resources to help teachers Find, Use and Share quality Education resources. To further that aim, ACMI looked to CC.

Credits—Photo: ‘Chunky‘ by Yun Huang Yong, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Get your floaties on, the (ABC) Pool has reopened

The roller door has been raised, the turnstiles unlocked, and everyone is invited to take a dip in the all new ABC Pool website. The new site boasts all kinds of new functionality and usability. Bomb dive your way into the site’s 11,000+ contributions with the site’s new structure, making it much easier to see uploaded content, pool contributorscollaborative projects and opportunities to get your content onto ABC websites, radio and even television. And now you can easily follow people and projects to help you keep up with your favorite pool-side punters and comment on pretty much everything on the site.

While we love the new 2.0 functionality, probably the most exciting addition (as far as ccAustralia is concerned anyway :p) is the ability to search for Pool content published under a Creative Commons licence. A much-awaited addition, users can now use the advanced search to find CC-licensed content by keyword using a drop-down menu that will return results under a specific type of CC licence. Better still is the ability to limit your results further by designating the type of media you’re looking for too!

Credits—Photo: Screenshot of ABC Pool website. Incorporates ‘Kiss me where?‘ by Kate Gauld, CC BY-NC 3.0 Unported.

Fiat brings open hardware and crowdsourcing to car manufacturing

Photo: Fiat Mio by Alexandre F Jorge
Starting with a very basic premise—’What will cars be like in the future?’—car manufacturer Fiat began the Fiat Mio project to capture the many different answers to that question. The project sought to conceptualise and ultimately manufacture a concept vehicle that was informed by the crowd.

Quoted in Contagious Magazine, Fiat’s manager of the Latin American Fiat Style Center, Peter Fassbender, explained:

A good designer tries to realise the wishes of everyone, and with this concept car we were truly working on everybody’s behalf. The group of designers working in the Fiat Mio house were totally open. There was transparency about every decision, which were all communicated online and commented on. This is completely different to the usual design process, which is entirely hidden and secretive.

Fassbender is also featured discussing Fiat’s rationale for the project in this video from Fiat’s YouTube channel:

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Fiat Mio‘ by Alexandre F. Jorge, CC BY-NC 2.0 Generic.