CC-licensing now possible on Pozible

Photo: 'Money' by Maestro_AU. CC BY 2.0 Generic.
Australia’s first crowd funding platform, Pozible (nee Fundbreak), are always looking for ways to make their platform more useful for project creators. That’s why they rolled out a series of new rights management options for projects starting yesterday. Now Pozible project creators can make content related to their crowd funding proposals on the site available under Creative Commons licences.

Project creators on Pozible now have a ‘License Option’ as part of their project creation process. They can elect ‘all rights reserved’ or they can apply a CC licence using Pozible’s very stylish (yet functional) licence chooser.

Credits—Photo: Money‘ by Maestro_AU, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Putting the R.E.M in remix

Photo: REM - Arena, Verona - 21 luglio 2008 by Andrea Sartorati
To coincide with yesterday’s release of R.E.M‘s new album Collapse Into Now, the American alternative rockers announced their first remix competition. Stems from the song ‘It Happened Today’ from the new album are available for download under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. Stems (legally) up for grabs include percussion, brass, piano, celeste, vibraphone, guitar, drum, banjo and mandolin stems and of course Michael Stipe’s vocals. If Stipe isn’t enough for you  there’s even a bit of Eddie Vedder on the track!!

Jacknife Lee, who helped produce Collapse Into Now with R.E.M, said that “Right from the early stages of recording this song in New Orleans Michael wanted to share the files with people to hear their different ideas and versions.” This was the impetus for the remix project and that’s exactly what Stipe has got!

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘R.E.M. – Arena, Verona – 21 luglio 2008‘ by Andrea Sartorati, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

ACMI generates rights literacy by releasing quality media products

Photo: Chunky by Yun Huang Yong
The Australian Centre for the Moving Image joins a growing list of Australian and international arts institutions making resources available for reuse and remixing under Creative Commons. In September last year ACMI launched Generator, an online creative studio space for students and teachers to access and engage with screen content. This week ACMI expanded on its commitment to teaching screen literacy through dynamic programs by relicensing the downloadable media resources on Generator under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommerical 3.0 Australia licence. The 1000+ media products available in the Free Media Library go beyond being passive teaching aids – they are now part of the wider commons of legally reuseable content.

The ACMI has spent over 20 years delivering dynamic screen literacy programs that create deep and engaging learning spaces for young people to be active producers of screen content. ACMI’s Generator project was initiated as a concerted effort by the Centre to address changes in teaching screen media. It is the outcome of funding from the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development to develop premium content for the FUSE Portal, a State-funded repository of content and resources to help teachers Find, Use and Share quality Education resources. To further that aim, ACMI looked to CC.

Credits—Photo: ‘Chunky‘ by Yun Huang Yong, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Get your floaties on, the (ABC) Pool has reopened

The roller door has been raised, the turnstiles unlocked, and everyone is invited to take a dip in the all new ABC Pool website. The new site boasts all kinds of new functionality and usability. Bomb dive your way into the site’s 11,000+ contributions with the site’s new structure, making it much easier to see uploaded content, pool contributorscollaborative projects and opportunities to get your content onto ABC websites, radio and even television. And now you can easily follow people and projects to help you keep up with your favorite pool-side punters and comment on pretty much everything on the site.

While we love the new 2.0 functionality, probably the most exciting addition (as far as ccAustralia is concerned anyway :p) is the ability to search for Pool content published under a Creative Commons licence. A much-awaited addition, users can now use the advanced search to find CC-licensed content by keyword using a drop-down menu that will return results under a specific type of CC licence. Better still is the ability to limit your results further by designating the type of media you’re looking for too!

Credits—Photo: Screenshot of ABC Pool website. Incorporates ‘Kiss me where?‘ by Kate Gauld, CC BY-NC 3.0 Unported.

Belgian court recognises CC licences

Photo: Creative Commons by Karin Dalziel
TechnoLlama is reporting that a Belgian court upheld a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works licence. Quoting Professor Séverine Dussollier of the University of Namur, TechnoLlama says:

A Belgian court today has applied the CC license to a copyright infringement suit. I attach the judgement (in French). The facts were simple, a music band had posted on its website some music under a CC license Non commercial – No derivative works. A theater adapted the music to make an advertisement for their theatrical season. The ad was broadcast on the national radio several times (with no attribution).
The band refused the damages that the theater proposed (1500 €) and decided to sue for copyright infringement.

The court acknowledged the licensing under the CC license and the fact that the theater did not respect any of the license features:

  • no attribution was made
  • the music was slightly modified for the ad
  • the advertisement, even for a theater was a commercial use prohibited by the license.

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Creative Commons‘ by Karin Dalziel, CC BY 2.0 Generic.