The Australian Parliament goes CC – with v3.0

Hopefully most of you have seen the official launch of the Australian v3.0 licences earlier today.

We’re very pleased to announce that the licences, only a few hours old, already have their first significant adopter. A couple of weeks ago the Australian Parliament officially announced, via the Australian Library and Information Association’s mailing list, that it will be porting its central http://www.aph.gov.au website across to a Creative Commons v3.0 BY-NC-ND Australian licence. This is the website which houses all the most important documents of the Australian Federal Government – including all bills, committee reports and, most importantly, the Hansard transcript of Parliamentary Sittings – so this is a major move for the Australian Government.

Credits—Photo: ‘Parliament House‘ by Ryan Wick, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

Show us the money! Oz Budget under CC

In the debate over the merits of last night’s conservative budget, there’s one thing we’d argue Swan did get right – the licensing.

The entire budget has been released under a Creative Commons Attribution licence. This means the material it contains – the deficit strategy, the fiscal aggregates, the government’s responses to the economic crisis – is all available for free reuse, by anyone, for any purpose, as long as the source is attributed.

A single document, even one that’s 350 pages long, may not seem like that big a deal compared to some of the other open government initiatives over the last few years – like the release of the Australian Bureau of Statistic’s entire store of census data under CC. But as a public endorsement of CC as the licence of choice for the Australian Federal Government, it’s huge.

Following the strong support for open access in the government’s response to the Gov 2.0 report last week, this is a great show of the government putting its money where its mouth is (sorry, I couldn’t resist). In fact, the last week has seen the release of three major Federal Government reports – the Budget, the Gov 2.0 response and the NBN Implementation Study – all under CC licences. This seems to be a great indicator that the government really means what it says – open access is going to be the default position for the Australian Federal Government from now on.

Bring on the remixes, mashups and YouTube tributes!

Update: And for those interested, a couple of good articles on the budget’s CC licensing by Craig Thomler and Computerworld

Creative Commons and Government in Australia

The use of Creative Commons licences by government in Australia is really heating up! From the Australian Bureau of Statistics releasing all census data under CC Attribution licences, to the Government 2.0 Taskforce recommending that public sector information be licensed under the CC Attribution licence as default, to the Australian Government releasing the entire 2010-11 Budget under a Creative Commons Attribution licence, more and more government agencies are using CC licences to distribute their copyright materials

This webpage tracks these developments and provides information about the use of Creative Commons licences by government agencies at all levels – local, State/Territory and Federal – in Australia.

Want to know more?
Follow CC in Government AU on Twitter at: [@govCCAu](http://twitter.com/govCCAu) or search for the hashtag [#govCCAu](http://twitter.com/#search?q=govCCAu) for updates