Don your red cape and support CC!

CC fundraising campaign 2010

Yesterday (US time) Creative Commons launched the annual fundraising drive for this CC fundraising campaign 2010 - icon2010. Each year CC encourages its community to donate, to help them continue their important work. This year the campaign has a superhero theme. Although the CC logo might be sporting a shiny (Doctorow-esque) red cape, the campaign actually focuses on real-world CC superheros.

In Joi’s words:

Our challenge ahead is to join forces with this legion of CC Superheroes to fight the forces that don’t want an open web, or do not understand that sharing is a good thing. This fall, we’re recruiting a team of CC Superheroes to lead the world in the fight for creativity and innovation. We need to raise $550,000 by the end of the year to power up and support the work we’re doing. As a superhero, your role will be to donate, spread the word, and fundraise on our behalf. As an existing supporter of CC, you already believe that a sharing world is a good world. You have fueled our work and kept us going strong, and we thank you for that. It will take nothing short of a superhero’s strength to get us to where we need to go.

In the campaign’s announcement, CC CEO Joi Ito shared a few of the international CC Superheroes—including GlaxoSmithKline, Pratham Books and SoundCloud—so allow me to take this opportunity to tell you about some of our very own Australian CC Superheroes, using our amazing tools to save people from failed sharing.

Credits—Banner Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘365_049‘ by Canned Muffins, CC BY 2.0 Generic. Image: ‘CC with cape‘ by Creative Commons Corporation, CC BY 3.0 Unported.

Show us the money! Oz Budget under CC

In the debate over the merits of last night’s conservative budget, there’s one thing we’d argue Swan did get right – the licensing.

The entire budget has been released under a Creative Commons Attribution licence. This means the material it contains – the deficit strategy, the fiscal aggregates, the government’s responses to the economic crisis – is all available for free reuse, by anyone, for any purpose, as long as the source is attributed.

A single document, even one that’s 350 pages long, may not seem like that big a deal compared to some of the other open government initiatives over the last few years – like the release of the Australian Bureau of Statistic’s entire store of census data under CC. But as a public endorsement of CC as the licence of choice for the Australian Federal Government, it’s huge.

Following the strong support for open access in the government’s response to the Gov 2.0 report last week, this is a great show of the government putting its money where its mouth is (sorry, I couldn’t resist). In fact, the last week has seen the release of three major Federal Government reports – the Budget, the Gov 2.0 response and the NBN Implementation Study – all under CC licences. This seems to be a great indicator that the government really means what it says – open access is going to be the default position for the Australian Federal Government from now on.

Bring on the remixes, mashups and YouTube tributes!

Update: And for those interested, a couple of good articles on the budget’s CC licensing by Craig Thomler and Computerworld

Creative Commons and Government in Australia

The use of Creative Commons licences by government in Australia is really heating up! From the Australian Bureau of Statistics releasing all census data under CC Attribution licences, to the Government 2.0 Taskforce recommending that public sector information be licensed under the CC Attribution licence as default, to the Australian Government releasing the entire 2010-11 Budget under a Creative Commons Attribution licence, more and more government agencies are using CC licences to distribute their copyright materials

This webpage tracks these developments and provides information about the use of Creative Commons licences by government agencies at all levels – local, State/Territory and Federal – in Australia.

Want to know more?
Follow CC in Government AU on Twitter at: [@govCCAu](http://twitter.com/govCCAu) or search for the hashtag [#govCCAu](http://twitter.com/#search?q=govCCAu) for updates

Victorian Government commits to CC licensing

Photo: Parliament of Victoria by Brian GiesenAs mentioned in our previous post, today is a very significant day for free culture in Australia, with the Victorian Government becoming the first Australian government to commit to using Creative Commons as the default licensing system for its public sector information.

The commitment is part of the Government’s response to its Economic Development and Infrastructure Committee’s Inquiry into Improving Access to Victorian Public Sector Information and Data, which recommended that the Victorian Government adopt a “hybrid public sector information licensing model comprising Creative Commons and a tailored suite of licences for restricted materials.”

Credits—Photo: Adaptation (crop and resize) of ‘Untitled‘ by Brian Giesen, CC BY 2.0 Generic.

More on Government Data – Geoscience Australia goes CC

Photo: Shattuck_23096-1, Uluru, NT by SouthernAntsWe know we’ve been publishing a lot about licensing of government documents and data of late, but there really has been so much happening that we just can’t resist. This week’s story is one we’ve actually been meaning to post about for a while.

As of late November Geoscience Australia has officially adopted Creative Commons Attribution as the default licence for its website. This means more than 18 877 products available through the website, including 3690 datasets, are now free to be reused, repurposed and remixed, including for commercial purposes – as long as you attribute Geoscience Australia as the original source, of course.

Credits—Photo: ‘Shattuck_23096-1, Uluru, NT‘ by SouthernAnts, CC BY 2.0 Generic.