Publications

Below is a list of publications by Creative Commons Australia and its affiliate research organisations. If you are after fact sheets and other resources see the Learn more section.

Creative Commons and Government Guide

The CC & Government Guide: Using Creative Commons 3.0 Australia Licences on Government Copyright Materials has been developed to assist government agencies apply Creative Commons licences to their copyright materials when distributing them. The guide explains how copyright law applies to Australian government material, how copyright can be managed to facilitate beneficial open access practices by government, how CC licences can be used to achieve open access to government material, and provides practical step-by-step guidance for agencies and their officers on licensing and use of government copyright materials under CC 3.0 Australia licences. The Guide  and its related factsheets are available at QUT’s ePrints repository under a CC BY 3.0 Australia licence.

Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project Reports and Guides for Academics and Researchers

OAK Law Project Report No. 1: Creating a legal framework for copyright management of open access within the Australian academic and research sectors (2006). The Report investigates a legal framework that supports open access to Australian academic and research outputs such as datasets, articles and electronic theses and dissertations. The Report explains that with the rise of networked digital technologies our knowledge landscape and innovation system is increasingly reliant on best practice copyright management strategies.

Practical Data Management: A Legal and Policy Guide
The guide considers, in a practical way, how copyright law, contract, privacy, the law of confidentiality and patent law can apply to datasets and databases. It then explains how research projects and organisations can strategically manage their data within this legal environment through the use of data management policies and principles, data management plans and data management toolkits. Model provisions for a data management plan are provided, as is a model data management toolkit for researchers. Finally, Appendix A to the guide is a sample repository deposit licence for research data that is being included in an open access repository or database.

Building the Infrastructure for Data Access and Reuse In Collaborative Research: An Analysis of the Legal Context This Report examines the legal framework within which research data is generated, managed, disseminated and used. It provides an overview of the operation of copyright law, contract and confidentiality laws, as well as a range of legislation – privacy, public records and freedom of information legislation – that is of relevance to research data. It provides practical guidance on the development and implementation of legal frameworks for data management with the objective of ensuring that research data can be accessed and used by other researchers.

Understanding Open Access in the Academic Environment: A Guide for Authors This guide aims to provide practical guidance for academic authors interested in making their work more openly accessible to readers and other researchers.  The guide addresses how open access goals can affect an author’s relationship with their commercial publisher and provides guidance on how to negotiate a proper allocation of copyright interests between an author and publisher. A Copyright Toolkit is provided to further assist authors in managing their copyright.

Open Content Licensing: Cultivating the Creative Commons

Open Content Licensing: Cultivating the Creative Commons brings together papers from some of the most prominent thinkers of our time on the internet, law and the importance of open content licensing in the digital age. Drawing on material presented at the Queensland University of Technology conference of January 2005, the text provides a snapshot of the thoughts of over 30 Australian and international experts on topics surrounding the international Creative Commons movement, from the landmark Eldred v Ashcroft copyright term decision to the legalities of digital sampling in a remix world. Download it directly from here.

Unlocking the Potential Through Creative Commons: An Industry Engagement and Action Agenda

In November 2006, the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCi), in conjunction with the Queensland University of Technology, hosted the CCau Industry Forum, a research-focused industry engagement event. The event was run by the CCi ccClinic and CC + OCL Research projects, and aimed to evaluate understanding of and attitudes towards copyright, OCL and CC in Australia. The Forum focused on the government, education and the creative industries sectors. Unlocking the Potential Through Creative Commons: An Industry Engagement and Action Agenda evaluates and responds to the outcomes of this Forum and presents a strategy for continued research into Creative Commons in Australia.

Building an Australasian Commons

Building an Australasian Commons: Creative Commons Case Studies Volume 1

The 2008 publication Building an Australasian Commons: Creative Commons Case Studies Volume 1 aims to document and provide examples of how Creative Commons licences are being used in Australia and internationally. With more than 60 case studies across the government, arts and education sectors, it provides a snap shot of the current practices of open access creators. Building an Australasian Commons is part of the international CC Case Study Wiki initiative.

Blog, Podcast, Vodcast and Wiki Copyright Guide for Australia

Blog, Podcast, Vodcast and Wiki Copyright Guide for Australia

The Blog, Podcast, Vodcast and Wiki Copyright Guide for Australia, which was launched in March 2009 by Creative Commons Australia’s sister project, the Law Research Program of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI), examines copyright issues which impact upon creators and users of blogs, podcasts, vodcasts and wikis in the Australian legal environment. In doing so it provides practical examples of how these issues may arise and be resolved.

Legal Aspects of Web 2.0 Activities: Management of Legal Risk Associated with Use of YouTube, MySpace and Second Life

Intellectual Property: Knowledge, Culture and Economy (IP:KCE) researchers Jessica Coates, Nic Suzor and Dr Anne Fitzgerald have prepared a report for the QLD Government entitled Legal Aspects of Web 2.0 Activities: Management of Legal Risk Associated with Use of YouTube, MySpace and Second Life. The report identifies the practical legal risks associated with activities conducted in online participatory spaces. Encompassing Copyright, Privacy, Defamation, Breach of Confidence and other areas of law, the report outlines the main considerations that arise when engaging in the online environment. It also examines the popular social networking platforms YouTube, MySpace and Second Life in detail, analysing legal issues specific to their Terms of Use and functionality.

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