Splotch by frollop – CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

We here at CCAU are always excited to hear about new concepts designed to help Australian/Kiwi creators get paid for what they do, especially when CC licences are involved. So we’re very happy to call attention to the launch of 60Sox, a new initiative coming out of the Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation.

60Sox is an online network aimed at connecting creative talent with industry professionals. By providing a home to showcase their digital wares, 60sox gives creators the opportunity to generate exposure, make industry contacts, receive feedback and critical appraisal from peers and industry DSLs (dead set legends) and…wait for it… get paid for their work!

The site acts as a meeting point for emerging creative practitioners and creative professionals by providing members with their own online gallery, which others can access (particularly employers) to critique their work, monitor industry trends and source new talent in a variety of creative disciplines. 60Sox uses member ratings to sort material, with the most highly rated items ‘floating’ to the top of the pile. It is also user moderated, with a ‘dodgy’ button where members can flag any item that they consider might have inappropriate or infringing content.

But what sets 60Sox apart from the crowd is the ‘2bobmob’, a forum of industry professionals who provide constructive feedback and advice to 60sox members. These professionals have committed to commenting on a certain number of works a month, and are able to provide their own ratings to boost material to the front page. Although 60Sox has only been online for a few weeks, the 2bobmob already includes such high-profile experts as author John Birmingham, DJ Kid Kenobi and Simon Cahill of Sony/BMG.

As an important part of its ethos of sharing as a vital part of promotion and creativity, 60Sox encourages creators to upload their materials under a Creative Commons licence. 60sox’s comprehensive, flexible and easy to follow upload system places it right up there in the CC best practice stakes. It uses the CC “Attribution–NonCommercial-ShareAlike Australia 2.5” licence as its default upload licence, but gives users the option to use another CC licence, or even all rights reserved if they wish. By doing so, 60sox actively promotes the exchange of artistic works in the digital domain and encourages creative interaction (eg through remixing), but at the same time retains creators’ freedom to choose their own licensing model to meet their own preferences.

The user interface clearly displays and explains the default licence, which creators can choose to bypass to the main CC licence generator. Members can set a default licence for all of their works, and are reminded of this licence and given the option to change it each time they upload. Further, they can choose a different licence for individual items and change the licence on a work at any time.

60sox is proving itself to be innovative in its rights management of online digital content, and a great resource for participants at all levels in the creative industries. So get out there and share!

article by Emma Carroll and Jessica Coates

60sox is a collaboration between the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), TAFESA, the Queensland Government, the Australian Interactive Media Industry Association (AIMIA), the Billy Blue School of Graphic Arts and the Southbank Institute of Technology

One thought on “60Sox – showing artists the money

  • 23 May 2009 at 9.59 am
    Permalink

    This seems like an ideal form of sharing and protecting digital content online between professionals and hopefuls. Perhaps new talent can use it as a stepping stone to get noticed.

    Daniel

    Reply

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